Snakes in New Hampshire (11 Different Types) - SnakeTracks.com (2022)

There are 11 species of snakes in New Hampshire and only one is venomous: the Timber Rattlesnake, which is protected by state law.

This means you cannot legally kill a Timber Rattlesnake and if you run into one, you should alert authorities once and for all so that they can have it taken care of for you.

New Hampshire’s Wildlife Action Plan identified several snake species by the amount of need for conservation. They deemed the Timber Rattlesnake, Smooth Green Snake, Northern Black Racer, and Ribbonsnake as endangered or at risk of endangerment by the state.

You cannot own non-venomous reptiles as pets, as it is deemed unlawful unless you are exhibitors by the state of New Hampshire.

While it is important to know the laws for owning snakes in New Hampshire, it’s also good to know what types of snakes you can find in the state. Here is our list:

Snakes in New Hampshire

Here are some common snakes that roam the state:

1. Common Gartersnake

Snakes in New Hampshire (11 Different Types) - SnakeTracks.com (1)
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Colubridae
  • Scientific Name: Thamnophis sirtalis
  • Other Names: Garter Snake
  • Adult Size: 23 to 30 inches; some can grow up to 5 feet
  • Lifespan: 4 to 5 years in the wild; up to 10 years in captivity

Common Garter Snakes are completely harmless to humans.

These guys are usually relatively small and like to remain active during the day. These guys like to soak often, so they will require a bowl in their tank for them to soak in, especially when it comes time to shed.

Garter snakes are great snakes for beginners since they are docile and will not grow to be too large.

Common Garter Snakes can range from dark olive-green to brown or black with a distinctive yellow stripe running throughout the length of their body.

When threatened, they may let off a musk in order to ward off predators. They can be found in many places like marshes, woodlands, meadows, or hillsides.

These snakes feed on leeches, slugs, worms, small fish, amphibians, and even other snakes. They are also immune to toxic frogs that secrete toxins from their skin in order to drive away prey.

2. Milksnake

Snakes in New Hampshire (11 Different Types) - SnakeTracks.com (2)
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Colubridae
  • Scientific Name: Lampropeltis triangulum
  • Other Names: Milk Snake
  • Adult Size: About 4 feet
  • Lifespan: 22 years

Milk Snakes are a species of Kingsnake that are non-venomous, friendly, docile, and beautiful to look at.

Milksnakes are tan or brown with black-brown bands and blotches that loop around the length of their body. Their skin can sometimes be a pale yellow with almost a red striped pattern, similar to the Western Milk Snake and the venomous Coral snake or a Rattlesnake, depending on the Milk Snake.

They have cat-like pupils that can look intimidating but lack the rattle at the end of their tails.

They can be found in meadows, pastures, under any artificial cover, by the edges of watercourses, by mountain cliffs, and woodlands. These carnivorous snakes feed on lizards, reptile eggs, birds and their eggs, mice, and sometimes insects.

3. Ribbon Snake

Snakes in New Hampshire (11 Different Types) - SnakeTracks.com (3)
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Colubridae
  • Scientific Name: Thamnophis sauritus
  • Other Names: Ribbonsnake
  • Adult Size: 16 to 35 inches
  • Lifespan: 10+ years in captivity; wild lifespan unknown

Ribbonsnakes are the most common species of Garter Snakes there are. These shy, non-poisonous snakes make popular pets due to their many morph options and the fact that they are not dangerous to keep.

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These snakes are the best-tempered out of all the subspecies of Ribbonsnakes and can make good pets for novice snake keepers when bought from a reputable pet store where they are captive-bred, of course.

Ribbonsnakes are usually slender-bodied, tan or dark brown with prominent light-colored stripes throughout their length which is usually a bright or pale yellow.

They are semi-aquatic creatures and can be found mostly near a water source like the shorelines of rivers or lakes. They will sometimes inhabit water edges near forests or wetlands.

They are carnivorous and feed on small fish, insects, and tadpoles.

4. Northern Watersnake

Snakes in New Hampshire (11 Different Types) - SnakeTracks.com (4)
  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Colubridae
  • Scientific Name: Nerodia sipedon
  • Other Names: Water Snake, Watersnake
  • Adult Size: 24 to 55 inches
  • Lifespan: 9 years

Northern Water Snakes are popular pets since they do not require much effort and are relatively safe, even around children. They can also grow fairly large in size.

They are usually dark in color, ranging from brown, tan, to gray, and have keeled scales. They also have square blotches on their backs and sides that may alternate or become bands throughout their length.

Water Snakes typically live in or near aquatic habitats which is why they are called water snakes. They like to bask on rocks by still or slow-moving water such as seasonal pools, lakes, and ponds.

You might see them swimming and hunting the waters as well.

They like to eat fish and amphibians, swallowing them whole and alive. They eat all kinds of fish species such as smallmouth bass, minnows, bullhead catfish, hogsuckers, sunfish, and brook trout.

5. Eastern Hog-nosed Snake

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  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Colubridae
  • Scientific Name: Heterodon platirhinos
  • Other Names: Eastern Hognosed snake, Eastern Hognose
  • Adult Size: 20 to 33 inches
  • Lifespan: 12 years

The Hognose snake is known to be one of the best pet snakes for enthusiasts since they are not fussy and are comfortable with human interaction. They also stay relatively small.

These worm-like snakes have a large, round head with an upward-facing snout, which is what we all love about them. They are dark gray or olive-green, but some are also yellow, tan, or light brown with dark brown spotted patterns on their head and sometimes their bodies.

They prefer to inhabit sandy woodlands, farmland, coastal areas, and fields where they feed on frogs, salamanders, invertebrates, birds, and small mammals. They can use their hog-like nose to get into their prey’s burrows more easily.

6. Ringneck Snake

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  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Colubridae
  • Scientific Name: Diadophis punctatus edwardsii
  • Other Names: Northern Ring-necked Snake
  • Adult Size: 10 to 15 inches
  • Lifespan: 10 to 20 years in the wild; 6 years in captivity

While you can keep these small snakes as pets, they do not usually do too well in captivity due to their timid nature and difficulties when breeding. All subspecies of the Ringneck snakes are threatened in their native habitats and should not be captured.

Ringneck Snakes are not the easiest to take care of since they have specific needs in order to stay alive. They also don’t make the best pets since they want to remain hidden at all times.

A lot of Ringnecks will be captured and taken from their habitats into the hands of overzealous first-time keepers. Usually, they will refuse to eat after a week or two in captivity.

However, they respond to handling quite well since they are not aggressive. Even though they are slightly venomous, their poison is comparable to that of a bee’s sting.

Ringnecks’ well-known defense mechanism is the curling up of their tail, which shows off their bright red underside and happens when they are feeling threatened. While they are non-aggressive, they may try to nip at you, but even that will be hard to do since they have rear-facing fangs.

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They pose very little threat to humans who want to handle them but do not enjoy being seen and like to remain hidden.

Northern Ringneck Snakes have a flat, black head with smooth scales all throughout their thin body, which is usually dark gray or a dull blue-gray in color. Their undersides may be a bright or pale yellow sometimes with small speckles or spots.

They get their name from the yellow or orange band that circles their neck. There are many subspecies that might vary in color.

They are sometimes mistaken to be Prairie Ringnecks since they are similar in size as well as color. You can differentiate them by looking at their undersides since a Northern Ringsnake will have a solid pale yellow belly without any markings.

These tiny snakes don’t like to be seen or out in the open so they like to inhabit areas like moist forests or dry deciduous forests. In these habitats, you can find them feasting on earthworms, smaller snakes, salamanders, small amphibians, and beetles.

7. Dekay’s Brownsnake

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  • Experience Level: Beginner
  • Family: Colubridae
  • Scientific Name: Storeria dekayi
  • Other Names: Brown Snake, DeKay’s Brown Snake
  • Adult Size: approximately 13 inches
  • Lifespan: 7 years in captivity; unknown in the wild

Brownsnakes are not shy and humans commonly encounter them. They can make great pets for beginners due to their size and gentle nature. They are also quite easy to feed.

These non-venomous snakes are usually brown in color, as their name suggests, but can also come in a yellowish, red, or grayish-brown tone.

They will typically have two rows of either darker or lighter spots which might also be linked, making it look like a collar or middorsal streak down the side of their head. Underneath each of their eyes may also be a small, dark spot.

These markings may also not appear on some individuals.

Their undersides will either be white or tan.

They like to reside in various woodlands, more commonly in wet areas like swamp edges or wetland borders. They like to roam the litters of abandoned fields, lowland hardwoods, prairies, and oak savannas.

They are also often spotted in residential areas or urbanized territories.

In their habitats, they will consume small invertebrates like earthworms, slugs, and snails with their specialized jaws and teeth. They may also eat beetles and salamanders if they come across one.

8. Smooth Green Snake

Snakes in New Hampshire (11 Different Types) - SnakeTracks.com (8)
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Colubridae
  • Scientific Name: Opheodrys vernalis
  • Other Names: Green Snake, Smooth Greensnake
  • Adult Size: 14 to 20 inches
  • Lifespan: 6 years

While you can find these snakes out in the wilderness, they are rarely encountered due to their timid nature.

Smooth Green snakes can make great pets for any owner that is a little squeamish about feeding them dead rodents. These guys will mostly eat insects like spiders, moths, ants, snails, slugs, worms, and spineless caterpillars.

However, it is said that they do not make great pets since they are way too timid for human interaction. However, they are harmless and some enjoy being handled.

They can be found in open woods, stream edges, marshes, and meadows. They thrive in moist, grassy areas.

As you can already tell by their name, these snakes will be a bright green, which can range in shade. They stay relatively small and may have a pale yellow underside with beady eyes.

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These are not the easiest snakes to keep captive since they are very anxious and easily stressed out.

9. North American Racer

Snakes in New Hampshire (11 Different Types) - SnakeTracks.com (9)
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Colubridae
  • Scientific Name: Coluber constrictor
  • Other Names: Black Racer, Racer, North American Blue Racer
  • Adult Size: Anywhere from 20 to 65 inches
  • Lifespan: 10 years

These slender snakes are versatile and are not dangerous or venomous. They are called racers because they are very fast-moving.

They are mostly docile creatures. However, if they feel threatened, they are ready to defend themselves. In most cases, it can be quite hard for these snakes to become accustomed to handling.

These snakes are silvery-grey and can sometimes be an almost metallic-looking electric blue. North American Racers will have a pale yellow or white underside and a black tongue.

A bite from them is shocking but harmless to humans or larger pets like dogs or cats.

They inhabit young or regrowing forest edges and shrubland. These Racers feed on small mammals, insects, smaller snakes, and lizards by swallowing them alive.

10. Red-bellied Snake

Snakes in New Hampshire (11 Different Types) - SnakeTracks.com (10)
  • Experience Level: Intermediate
  • Family: Colubridae
  • Scientific Name: Storeria occipitomaculata
  • Other Names: Redbelly snake, Red-belly Snake, Copperbelly Snake, Northern Red-bellied Snake
  • Adult Size: 8 to 16 inches
  • Lifespan: 4 years in captivity; Wild lifespan unknown but predicted to be longer than in captivity

While Red-bellied Snakes are rarely encountered in the state, they still exist in the wilderness. They are just very secretive.

These small snakes can be found in swarms basking in the sun on the warm days of September to October. You can also find them in woodlands, fields, under logs, in forests, bike trails, back roads, and sphagnum bogs.

In these areas, they feed on earthworms, beetle larvae, and slugs.

People can sometimes find them out in their pesticide-free garden or just out in the wild and might want to keep them as a pet. However, they really struggle to eat when in captivity and will sometimes just outright refuse when they are removed from the wild.

They do not do well in captivity and prefer to be free to roam the lands as they please. Although they aren’t hard to obtain in the wild, they might not be the best pet to keep if you are planning to have them for long since they do not do well away from their natural habitat.

Due to this, you might not run into them as often in the wild since they like to stick to their spaces. They are not as tolerant of populated areas.

It’s not hard to identify these snakes since they really do live up to their name with their flashy red or orange undersides. Their bodies might be a dark steel grey, black with a blue tint, or copper brown. Some may also have two dark stripes along their sides or a thick, light-colored band down the middle of their backs.

While they will usually first curl their tails or flee in defense before they try to bite, their little nibble probably won’t affect you anyway.

While they are small and beautiful, this does not mean they will make a good pet since they do not usually survive long in captivity.

Venomous Snake Species in New Hampshire

Here is a list of the most venomous snakes that roam the state:

11. Timber Rattlesnake

Snakes in New Hampshire (11 Different Types) - SnakeTracks.com (11)
  • Experience Level: Expert
  • Family: Viperidae
  • Scientific Name: Crotalus horridus
  • Other Names: Canebrake Rattlesnake, Banded Rattlesnake
  • Adult Size: 6 feet
  • Lifespan: Anywhere from 10 to 30 years in the wild; 30+ years in captivity

Rattlesnake bites are very serious and should be treated as a medical emergency. However, they are also somewhat timid creatures, meaning they are not often spotted.

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These vipers are usually gray or yellow-brown in color with dark brown blotches all or bands throughout their body and a brown, yellow, or copper stripe running down the length of their back.

They can generally be found in bluffs, croplands, rugged deciduous forest terrains, rocky ledges, and dense woodlands with closed canopies. They like to move around during different seasons and females will move to rocky terrains when they are pregnant for higher temperatures.

Timber Rattlesnakes feed mainly on smaller mammals but will also eat the occasional bird if they feel like it.

Conclusion

Whether you are a New Hampshire resident or are, for whatever reason, interested in learning what snake species are available in the area, we hope that this article did you justice.

While there are few species available in the state, they still add to the interesting wildlife. Whether you are visiting or live there, watch out for the Timber Rattler!

Let us know in the comment section down below about your experiences with owning a snake if you are from the state of New Hampshire.

Snakes in other states

  • Snakes in Maine
  • Snakes in Massachusetts
  • Snakes in Rhode Island

References

https://www.wildlife.state.nh.us/nongame/snakes.html

https://www.wildlife.state.nh.us/nongame/rules-amp-rept.html

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Table of Contents

FAQs

What kind of snakes are found in New Hampshire? ›

New Hampshire has only one venomous snake, the timber rattlesnake, which is protected by law. If you think you see a timber rattlesnake, please leave it alone, and let us know.

What is the largest snake in New Hampshire? ›

The Northern black racer (state-threatened) and timber rattlesnake (state-endangered) are the largest snakes in NH ranging in length from 36-60 inches. The Northern red-bellied snake is NH's smallest snake ranging from 8-10 inches in length.

What happens if a garter snake bites you? ›

Bite. While most species are classified as harmless (non-venomous), their bite can cause minor swelling or itching in humans, and anyone bitten by a garter snake should clean the bite thoroughly. It is not ultimately a cause for concern.

What are snakes afraid of? ›

There are many scents snakes don't like including smoke, cinnamon, cloves, onions, garlic, and lime. You can use oils or sprays containing these fragrances or grow plants featuring these scents.

What is the most common snake type? ›

A variety of snake species are kept in captivity. The most common, by far, are the colubrids, boids, and pythons. The colubrids (1658+ species) are the largest and most diverse group of snakes and have a worldwide distribution, except for Antarctica. Both venomous and nonvenomous species are found within this family.

Are there water moccasins in NH? ›

Cottonmouth snakes, also known as water moccasins, do not live in Vermont or New Hampshire. These venomous snakes live only in the South.

Are there milk snakes in New Hampshire? ›

Eastern Milk Snake (Lampropeltis triangulum triangulum)

Distribution: Throughout NH except far northern regions. Description: A slender-bodied snake ranging from 24-36 inches. There are heavy red or reddish-brown blotches over a gray base along the top and a black-on-white checkerboard pattern on the belly.

Are NH water snakes poisonous? ›

Is it venomous? No. New Hampshire is home to only one venomous snake, the timber rattlesnake, which is exceptionally rare and is protected by law. Northern water snakes — and any other snake species you are likely to find in or near water in the Granite State — are not venomous.

Is there a free app to identify snakes? ›

It's called Snake Snap. The app has three main features, two are educational. “Did You Know” teaches snake trivia.

How can you keep snakes away? ›

How to Keep Snakes Away from Your House
  1. Replace grass or mulch with gravel. Snakes can't move or hide easily on gravel and other hard surfaces.
  2. Remove bird feeders, birdbaths, and other sources of food and water. ...
  3. Keep pet food inside. ...
  4. Trim bushes and trees. ...
  5. Reconsider water features. ...
  6. Install snake-proof fencing.
7 Mar 2022

What snakes are mistaken for copperheads? ›

The most common snake misidentified as a copperhead is the harmless juvenile Eastern Ratsnake (formerly called the blackrat snake). The Eastern Ratsnake starts life with a strong pattern of gray or brown blotches on a pale gray background.

Will water snakes bite? ›

Even though water snakes are nonvenomous, they can still bite and are often killed by humans out of fear that they are cottonmouths.

Does a northern water snake bite hurt? ›

The northern water snake isn't venomous but if cornered or captured, it won't hesitate to defend itself biting repeatedly, defecating and releasing a foul smelling musk. A large adult can inflict a painful bite, which can bleed profusely since their saliva contains a mild anticoagulant.

How big do water snakes get? ›

Northern water snakes are medium to large snakes, ranging from 61 to 140 cm.

What can you pour down a snake hole? ›

The best way to get rid of a snake hole is to fill it with concrete. This will create an impenetrable barrier between the snakes and their food source, so they can't eat any more prey animals in your yard for some time. If it's a harmless garter snake, you may just want to leave its hole alone.

Why do garter snakes come in houses? ›

Like all reptiles, garter snakes are cold-blooded creatures, so they are often found in locations that offer warmth and food. These slender snakes can enter your home through fairly small cracks. Garter snakes often snack on small mammals, too, such as mice, and small amphibians, such as toads and frogs.

What happens if a garter snake bites my dog? ›

These snakes are considered mildly venomous. Their venom does not affect humans, but amphibians and small animals may experience minor toxicity from a garter snake bite. Your pup may experience some irritation if he is bitten, but it is unlikely to be serious.

What is the number 1 deadliest snake? ›

1. Saw-Scaled Viper (Echis Carinatus) – The Deadliest Snake In The World. Although its venom is not very potent, the Saw-Scaled Viper is considered as one of the world's deadliest snakes as it is believed to be responsible for more human fatalities than all other snakes put together.

Which snake bite kills fastest? ›

The black mamba, for example, injects up to 12 times the lethal dose for humans in each bite and may bite as many as 12 times in a single attack. This mamba has the fastest-acting venom of any snake, but humans are much larger than its usual prey so it still takes 20 minutes for you to die.

What snake kills the most humans every year? ›

The killer of the most people

The saw-scaled viper (Echis carinatus) may be the deadliest of all snakes, since scientists believe it to be responsible for more human deaths than all other snake species combined.

What plant will keep snakes away? ›

What will naturally keep snakes away? Snake-repellent plants, such as marigolds, allium, lemongrass, mother-in-law's tongue, garlic, wormwood, pink agapanthus, snakeroots, basil and yellow alder will all keep snakes away naturally.

What is the enemy of snake? ›

The snake's biggest enemy is the mongoose, which is quick enough to dart in and bite the back of the cobra's neck before the snake can defend itself. "Spitting cobra" refers to any one of several cobra varieties that have the ability to spit or spray venom from their fangs in defense.

Are snakes scared of dogs? ›

They're afraid of your dog.” She stresses that unless provoked, most snakes will not go after you, nor will they go after your dog. So next time you and your dog see a snake, don't panic. Hold on tight to your pup's leash and walk away from the reptile.

What snake is least likely to bite? ›

Species such as corn snakes, ball pythons, rosy boas and California king snakes are usually gentle and make great pets that are not known to bite. Alternatively, reticulated pythons and black racer snakes are generally more aggressive and can be more prone to biting when threatened.

What snake has no venom? ›

Pythons, number 1 on our list, can grow up to 30 feet long. Our number 5 pick is the rat snake, which is large in size, very common, and mostly harmless to humans. Ranking at number, the green snake is native to North American marshes, fields, and forests.

Are there friendly snakes? ›

#1) Corn snake

The friendliest snake in the world is the corn snake. They would be voted “best personality” in the yearbook of snakes. Corn snakes are very friendly and love to be handled. Because they are easy to take care of they are one of the most popular pet snakes.

Where are the timber rattlesnakes in New Hampshire? ›

Habitat: Rocky, south-facing hillsides in wooded areas that are exposed to an abundance of sunlight. Rock ledges and outcroppings on hilltops are used for basking. Deep rock crevices are used as den sites for hibernation. During summer their habitat expands to brushy, forested areas where they often bask in sunspots.

Are there rattlesnakes on Rattlesnake Island NH? ›

The Naming of Rattlesnake Island

Yes it is true that there were rattlesnakes on the island although it has been many decades since anyone has confirmed seeing one on the island. How the snakes got there is a mystery, although the ledges was an ideal habitat for them.

Are there copperhead snakes in NH? ›

Other: The northern brown snake is killed in many suburban areas after being mistaken for a copperhead snake, however, copperheads have hourglass-shaped bands and bright yellow tail tips (and are not found in New Hampshire).

What does a baby copperhead snake look like? ›

What do baby copperhead snakes look like? Baby copperheads look almost the same as adult copperheads in pattern and coloring, but may have a yellow-colored tail or dark head at birth. Also, young copperheads may be more gray in color than adult copperheads.

Are rat snakes in NH? ›

Timber Rattlesnake

Timber Rattlesnakes are the only venomous snake species living in New Hampshire. They are found in the White Mountains and are critically endangered. The species have a triangular head, keeled scales and grow to about 36 to 60 inches (94-152cm) long.

Do milk snakes bite? ›

Understanding that the milksnake is non-venomous is important. If startled or cornered, this snake may strike in self defense; however, no snake will deliberately attack a human.

Do water snakes go on land? ›

Water snakes spend a lot of time swimming or basking in shallows, but they also venture on land and climb trees. Still, they never stray far from a water source.

Is the northern water snake aggressive? ›

What should I do if I find a Northern Water Snake? Look, but don't touch! Even though they are not venomous, water snakes are considered an aggressive species and will bite if handled. If you do pick one up and get bitten, don't panic!

How do you get rid of northern water snakes? ›

Identifying and Controlling Water Snakes
  1. Remove, trim and maintain shoreline grasses and emergent plants – this will reduce the habitat for the snakes.
  2. Control the food source – stock fish to eat frog eggs and tadpoles, use barn cats or other methods to control mice.
  3. Use a deterrent such as sulfur.
23 Oct 2014

Can I upload a picture of a snake for identification? ›

Take or upload a photo of any snake and get a fast accurate response with your snake's identity, diet, habitat, and a brief characteristic description from our expert panel.

What kind of snake has a red stripe down its back? ›

Thamnophis proximus rubrilineatus, the Redstripe Ribbon Snake is with its striking red middorsal stripe a highly attractive and still rarely kept and bred subspecies of T. proximus.

Is SnakeSnap a free app? ›

I'm happy to tell you I got an answer in about 1 minute. The email had a pretty good explanation and offered more information on snakes, venomous and non-venomous where I live. SnakeSnap is a free app but requires a subscription.

Does bleach keep snakes away? ›

Best Rattlesnake Deterrents

Vinegar and bleach can both be used to keep rattlesnakes away from your home. Bleach is less commonly used because it is a much stronger chemical that could be damaging to plants or other animals. Vinegar is most often used to keep snakes away from bodies of water.

Do mothballs keep snakes away? ›

Mothballs are commonly thought to repel snakes, but they are not intended to be used this way and have little effect on snakes.

What to do if you see a copperhead in your yard? ›

If you do see a copperhead, leave it alone or call a professional to relocate the snake to a safer place. Do not try to kill the snake, because you increase your chance of being bitten.

What does a rat snake looks like? ›

The eastern ratsnake is a shiny black snake with weakly keeled scales and an irregular black and white checkerboard pattern on the belly. The chin and throat are cream or white in color. Juveniles look very different. They have strongly patterned backs of gray and brown blotches on pale gray.

Does New Hampshire have a lot of snakes? ›

New Hampshire is home to eleven snake species, with only one venomous species out of the bunch. This is one of the smallest numbers of species in the country, but it's still worth looking at. In addition, most are endangered, and authorities are putting efforts to conserve them.

Do water moccasins live in New Hampshire? ›

Cottonmouth snakes, also known as water moccasins, do not live in Vermont or New Hampshire. These venomous snakes live only in the South.

Are NH water snakes poisonous? ›

Is it venomous? No. New Hampshire is home to only one venomous snake, the timber rattlesnake, which is exceptionally rare and is protected by law. Northern water snakes — and any other snake species you are likely to find in or near water in the Granite State — are not venomous.

Are copperheads found in NH? ›

Other: The northern brown snake is killed in many suburban areas after being mistaken for a copperhead snake, however, copperheads have hourglass-shaped bands and bright yellow tail tips (and are not found in New Hampshire).

What poisonous snakes live in NH? ›

Timber rattlesnakes are NH's only venomous snake but also are docile and are unlikely to strike unless provoked or stepped on.

Are there milk snakes in New Hampshire? ›

Eastern Milk Snake (Lampropeltis triangulum triangulum)

Distribution: Throughout NH except far northern regions. Description: A slender-bodied snake ranging from 24-36 inches. There are heavy red or reddish-brown blotches over a gray base along the top and a black-on-white checkerboard pattern on the belly.

Where are rattlesnakes located in New Hampshire? ›

New Hampshire's only venomous snake, the timber rattlesnake, is critically endangered and is found only in small pockets in the southern portion of the state. Timber rattlers are one of the most docile animals I've ever encountered and you'd be extremely lucky to see one in the wild.

Are there timber rattlesnakes in NH? ›

In New Hampshire, the timber rattlesnake is likely the most endangered of any wildlife species, as there is only one known extant population. Timber rattlesnakes have large home ranges, especially males, and individuals may be killed as they cross roads or as human‐snake encounters increase.

Do water snakes bite? ›

Even though water snakes are nonvenomous, they can still bite and are often killed by humans out of fear that they are cottonmouths.

How do I keep snakes out of my water dock? ›

A deterrent such as sulfur (or granulated sulfur is what I prefer) will help you discourage snakes around your pond or lake. An added benefit is the use of granulated sulfur will also help deter chiggers, fleas and ticks.

Do water snakes go on land? ›

Water snakes spend a lot of time swimming or basking in shallows, but they also venture on land and climb trees. Still, they never stray far from a water source.

Does a northern water snake bite hurt? ›

The northern water snake isn't venomous but if cornered or captured, it won't hesitate to defend itself biting repeatedly, defecating and releasing a foul smelling musk. A large adult can inflict a painful bite, which can bleed profusely since their saliva contains a mild anticoagulant.

Is the northern water snake aggressive? ›

What should I do if I find a Northern Water Snake? Look, but don't touch! Even though they are not venomous, water snakes are considered an aggressive species and will bite if handled. If you do pick one up and get bitten, don't panic!

What animal kills copperheads? ›

Predators. Owls and hawks are the copperhead's main predators. Opossums, raccoons and other snakes may also prey on copperheads.

How far can a copperhead strike? ›

The answer depends, in part, on the length of the snake. In most cases, a snake can strike up to a distance between 1/3 to 1/2 of its body length. For example, if the snake is four feet in length, its strike can likely reach no more than two feet.

Can copperheads climb trees? ›

They climb into low bushes or trees to hunt prey and will also bask in the sun and swim in the water. The copperhead is one of about 20 snakes native to Washington, D.C., and is the only venomous species in the area.

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